Skip to main content
Skip to main content
Dartmouth College Library
Dartmouth College Library Research Guides

Scholarly Publishing & Communication: Dartmouth Faculty Open Access Policy

Locate current resources on all aspects of scholarly publishing and communication across all subject areas.

About the Dartmouth Faculty Open Access Policy Resolution

The Dartmouth Faculty Open Access Policy and associated materials are on the Council on the Libraries web page under Current Topics. The policy was approved by the Thayer School of Engineering in March 2013, and by the Faculty of Arts & Sciences in April 2015. 

What is the purpose of the Dartmouth Faculty Open Access Policy Resolution?

This policy provides for scholarly journal articles to be made open access in the long term via the institution's digital repository, through grant of a license on the part of the faculty to Dartmouth  prior to publishing their work. Authors own the copyright to their work so can grant this prior license to the institution before they sign the copyright or license transfer to the publisher.  

It does NOT require faculty to publish in open access journals. Faculty continue to send their work to whatever journals they choose.

What does the Policy do?

  • Applies to scholarly articles only
  • Allows for sharing on the web, reuse in publications, and for course readings-legally!
  • Allows the institution to provide long term preservation
  • Includes embargoes and "opt out" options

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Exactly what materials are covered under the Policy?

The final peer reviewed, pre-published version of the scholarly articles authored by Dartmouth faculty are specified in the open access policy. For this purpose, “scholarly articles” are defined as works describing the outcome of scholarly study or research that are produced with no expectation of payment, such as those usually made available through peer-reviewed scholarly journals and conference proceedings. Although scholarly articles of this nature are specified, this does not prevent an author from making other kinds of material open access using the infrastructure built to provide access to articles under this policy. The policy applies to articles submitted for publication after adoption of the policy.

2. How will this policy work?

  • You submit your article to the journal of your choice (you own all the copyrights until you transfer these to the publisher)
  • After the peer review process is finished and the paper accepted, you sign the copyright transfer agreement (under the Dartmouth Open Access policy, you have already retained rights to your final peer reviewed version)
    • In the rare cases where the publisher asks that the rights held under this policy be waived for the article, you can opt out of the Dartmouth Open Access Policy by sending the article information to Open.Access.Waiver@dartmouth.edu. You will automatically receive a note that the policy is waived for that article.
    • In the many cases where the publisher asks authors to embargo posting their articles for a given period of time, no action is required on your part. 
  • You forward your final, peer-reviewed, pre-published article to a designated e-mail address but if that version is already available in a repository, it will be gathered directly from that source. 
  • The final peer reviewed version of the article will be made available to the public through the Dartmouth digital infrastructure developed for promoting scholarly work at Dartmouth, the Dartmouth Academic Commons.

3. How does this apply to co-authored papers?

Each author of an article holds copyright in the article individually, so any author of a co-authored paper can assign the prior license without getting permission from the other co-authors. It is not necessary to get permission from each co-author; however, the co-authors are encouraged to communicate about the policy. If a co-author prefers not to have the article available under this policy, the author can choose to ask for a waiver.         

4. What if the publisher objects to my having transferred a license to Dartmouth before signing the copyright transfer agreement?

Publishers often allow authors rights to post the final peer reviewed version of their articles on open access repositories, so this is not usually an issue at all. In the few cases where the publisher asks the author to waive the Dartmouth Faculty Open Access policy for the article, a waiver is automatically granted via an email request. This is covered in the the "opt out" part of the policy. 

5. How does this policy relate to open access publishing?

This policy addresses providing access to articles that are published in a wide variety of outlets with different business models. It does not require an author to choose an open access journal or to pay the additional fees required by some publishers to make an individual article open access.

6. Can I have an embargo on access to my article?

Yes, you can request an embargo for a particular article by sending the article information to Open.Access.Waiver@dartmouth.edu and it will be automatically granted. 

7. What kinds of uses are covered under the Dartmouth Faculty Open Access Policy?

Dartmouth cannot sell the articles, so for example Dartmouth cannot created a course pack for sale out of the articles made open access by this policy. 

8. I use images and other media in my articles, and often have to pay for permission to use these. Do I have to pay again to have my complete article made openly available under this policy?

No, you do not have to seek permissions again, since any arrangements for materials in your articles continue to apply under the open access policy.

9. If I am no longer at Dartmouth, will I be able to remove my article?

Policies about retention of the articles in the digital repository have yet to be developed with input from faculty.

10. I already put the final peer-reviewed version of my article into the open access PubMedCentral due to grant requirements or in an open access repository (arXiv.org or Repec are examples).  Will I have to follow a similar process for this?

No extra steps need to be taken unless a waiver is requested.

11. Have there been legal challenges to this kind of policy? What about "restraint of trade" for example?

No, since there is a solid legal and contractual basis for this kind of faculty open access policy, including the transfer of copyright and restraint of trade questions. Faculty open access policies do not result in any restraint of trade and are not a threat to journal publishing business models such as subscriptions.